Texture is the tactile grain of surfaces and substances.
In design, texture is both physical and virtual. Textures
include the literal surface employed in the making of a
printed piece or physical object as well as the optical
appearance of that surface. Paper can be rough or smooth,
fabric can be nubby or fine, and packaging material can
be glossy or matte. Physical textures affect how a piece
feels to the hand, but they also affect how it looks. A
smooth or glossy or matte. Physical textures affect how a
piece feels to the hand, but they also affect how it looks.
A smooth or glossy surface, for example, reflects light
differently than a soft or pebbly one.
Many of the textures that designers manipulate are
not physically experienced by the viewer at all, but exist
as optical effect and representation. Texture adds detail
to an image, providing an overall surface quality as well as
rewarding the eye when viewed up close.

As in life, the beauty of texture in design often
lies in its poignant juxtaposition or contrast: prickly/
soft, sticky/dry, fuzzy/smooth, and so on. By placing
one texture in relation to its opposite, or a smart counter-
part, the designer can amplify the unique formal proper-
ties of each one.
Designers generate textures by hand, camera,
computer, and code. Textures are abstract and concrete,
and they can be captured, sliced, built, and brushed.
Texture has a genuine, visceral, wholly seductive ca-
pacity to reel us in and hold us.